What kind of hair do you have?

There's a lot of confusion about what kind of hair people have; type and texture. Fine, Course, Thin and Thick...so few people seem to know how to describe their head of hair accurately...and I don't blame them! The language can be confusing! So let's clear some things up.

For the basics of hair descriptors, there's two categories, with two options in each. You'll pick ONE option from each category, and describe your hair with TWO words. We're going with the very basics, here.

First is for the width of your hairs...the actual texture and size of each strand.

Hair texture words are FINE and COARSE.

Fine:

Fine hair has a small diameter, and generally a smooth texture. Each individual strand, if looked under the microscope, would be skinny. Fine hair is usually soft, and tends to be more shiny naturally.

Coarse:

Coarse hair is larger and more broad in diameter. Strand by strand, the texture is not as "slippery" as fine hair. While it can still be very soft, many people with course hair complain that their hair isn't silky smooth.

 

The second category is for the density of your hair. How many hairs PER SQUARE INCH on your head. These descriptions have NOTHING to do with the texture or diameter of each hair, but only with how MANY hairs are on your head.

Hair density words are THIN and THICK.

Thin:

Thin hair means that there's not as many hairs, or that hair follicles are a further apart from one another. If hair is "thinning", it is falling out and there are fewer hairs on the head.

Thick:

Thick hair means that it is DENSE! There'are many hairs in any given space on your head.

Many times I've heard people describe their hair as "thick" when it's not very dense and they really mean coarse. Or that they're hair is "thin" when they actually have a TON of it, but it's really fine.

Describing your hair accurately can help you tremendously as you're looking for styles and haircuts, or even just interacting with your hairstylist! And if you're among the few who have multiple textures and varying density on different places of your head...that can be VERY helpful to identify. It will save you a lot of frustration as you wonder why your hair doesn't fit completely into either category!